Celebrating Children’s Day

Tuesday 4 August is National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children’s Day: the largest national day celebrating  Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children.

This year’s theme – Little People, Big Futures – is about helping kids stand tall and feel connected and proud in culture. This strong connection to culture helps Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children develop a strong sense of self, supporting them on their way to a comprehensive education and a big future.

As part of our Reconciliation Action Plan (RAP), Summerhill Park Kindergarten acknowledges and celebrates key dates and events in the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander calendar.  Raising awareness of National Children’s Day is one way in which we can show our support for Aboriginal children, as well as learn about the impact that community, culture and family play in the life of every Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander child.

Visit the National  Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children’s Day website for more information or email the kinder for details of our Reconciliation Action Plan and how you can get involved.

The following fact sheet was provided by Reconciliation Australia with assistance from SNAICC.

Did you know? Facts about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children

  • The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population is much younger than the wider Australian community population, with more than one in three Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people under 15 years of age (compared with one-fifth of the wider Australian community).
  • Traditional Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures contain natural protective and wellbeing features such as kinship networks.
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children are healthier and happier when they have strong language, culture and cultural identity.
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children are almost 10 times more likely to be placed in out-of-home care than non-Indigenous children.
  • While comprising just 5.5% of all children aged 0-17 years in Australia, in 2013-14 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children amounted to nearly 35% of all children placed in out-of-home care.
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander teenagers in urban and regional areas attend school more regularly if they speak an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander language.
  • Where cultural identity is strong, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students are more likely to complete secondary school.
  • Indigenous children are over-represented in out-of-home care across all age groups.